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We Review the Best of the Latest Books

ISSN 1934-6557

January 2016, Issue #201

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Guide to Contents this Page 

Sharon Pollock: First Woman of Canadian Theatre edited by Donna Coates (The West Series, Book 7: University of Calgary Press)

Magazines, Travel, and Middlebrow Culture: Canadian Periodicals in English and French, 1925-1960 by Faye Hammill & Michelle Smith (The University of Alberta Press)

The Soft Touch: A Photographer's Guide to Manipulating Focus by Jim Cornfield (Amherst Media)

Meditation in Seven Steps: Unlocking the Depths of Human Fulfillment Audio CD – Audiobook, 2 CDs, running time: 2 hours, 29 minutes by Reginald A. Ray PhD (Sounds True)

Why Should Anyone Be Led by You?: What It Takes To Be An Authentic Leader by Robert Goffee & Gareth Jones (Harvard Business Review Press) (February 2006)

Streamlined: Classic Cars of the 20th Century by Malte Jürgens, with photography by Michel Zumbrunn (Schiffer Publishing, Ltd)

Benjamin West and the Struggle to be Modernby Loyd Grossman (Merrell Publishers)

The Lion of Sabray: The Afghani Warrior Who Defied the Taliban and Saved the Life of Navy SEAL Marcus Luttrell by Patrick Robinson (Touchstone)

Let's Talk About Death: Asking the Questions that Profoundly Change the Way We Live and Die by Steve Gordon & Irene Kacandes (Prometheus Books)

The Vulture: An Ike Schwartz Mystery by Frederick Ramsay (Ike Schwartz Series: Poisoned Pen Press)

Life Size Birds by Nancy J. Hajeski (Thunder Bay Press)

AANA Advanced Arthroscopic Surgical Techniques Series, 5 volumes (Slack Incorporated)

Books in the Series include:

  • The Elbow and Wrist: AANA Advanced Arthroscopic Surgical Techniques edited by Felix H. Savoie III MD, Larry D. Field MD, & Scott P. Steinmann MD
  • The Foot and Ankle: AANA Advanced Arthroscopic Surgical Techniques edited by James W. Stone MD, John G. Kennedy MD, FRCS(Orth), & Mark Glazebrook MD
  • The Hip: AANA Advanced Arthroscopic Surgical Techniques edited by J.W. Thomas Byrd MD, Asheesh Bedi MD, & Allston J. Stubbs MD
  • The Knee: AANA Advanced Arthroscopic Surgical Techniques edited by Nicholas A. Sgaglione MD, James H. Lubowitz MD, & Matthew Provencher MD
  • The Shoulder: AANA Advanced Arthroscopic Surgical Techniques edited by Richard K.N. Ryu MD, Richard L. Angelo MD, & Jeffrey Abrams MD

In each of these volumes, the written text is supported by numerous color images and a website with invaluable narrated video clips depicting disease-specific arthroscopic techniques specific to the appropriate procedure.
Expert contributors have been chosen for their expertise in specific topics, so readers benefit by the highest quality and treatment recommendations to provide state-of-the-art care to their patients.

'Behold, the Angels Came and Served Him': A Compositional Analysis of Angels in Matthew by Kristian A. Bendoraitis (The Library of New Testament Studies Series: Bloomsbury T&T Clark)

Can War be Just in the 21st Century? edited by Tobias Winright & Laurie Johnston (Orbis Books)

The Materiality of Magic: An artifactual investigation into ritual practices and popular beliefs edited by Ceri Houlbrook & Natalie Armitage (Oxbow Books)

An Illustrated Coastal Year: The seashore uncovered season by season by Celia Lewis (Bloomsbury Publishing Plc)

Arts & Entertainment / Theater

Sharon Pollock: First Woman of Canadian Theatre edited by Donna Coates (The West Series, Book 7: University of Calgary Press)

As playwright, actor, director, teacher, mentor, theatre administrator, and critic, Sharon Pollock has played an integral role in the shaping of Canada’s national theatre tradition, and she continues to produce new works and to contribute to Canadian theatre as passionately as she has done over the past fifty years. Pollock is nationally and internationally respected for her work and support of the theatre community. She has also had a major part in informing Canadians about the ‘dark side’ of their history and current events. This collection, entitled Sharon Pollock, composed entirely of new and original assessments of her work and contribution to theatre, is both timely and long overdue.
The book includes a new play titled “Sharon’s Tongue” by the Playing with Pollock Collective, as well as transcripts of seventeen of Pollock’s own reviews of plays from her CBC Radio feature Pollock on Plays.
The editor of Sharon Pollock is Donna Coates, professor in the Department of English at the University of Calgary. Contributors include: Kathy K. Y. Chung, Carmen Derksen, Sherrill Grace, Martin Morrow, Jeton Neziraj, Wes Pearce, Tanya Schaap, Shelley Scott, Jerry Wasserman, Jason Weins, and Cynthia Zimmerman. The book is part of The West Series with series editor Aritha van Herk, a series focusing on creative nonfiction that explores our sense of place in the West.

According to Coates in the introduction, Sharon Pollock: First Woman of Canadian Theatre is an appropriate title for this new collection of essays on the life and work of the foremost woman in Canadian theatre. Not surprisingly, the number of awards and prizes Pollock has won for her enormous and lengthy contribution to Canadian theatre is staggering. Pollock has also received provincial, local, and national awards for her support of theatre. She has also achieved considerable international recognition. Her plays continue to be performed in major theatres throughout Canada, in the United States, and in Europe; she has conducted playwriting and theatre workshops nationally and internationally, and she continues to collaborate with national and international groups in the development of new scripts. Pollock also holds five honorary doctorates – from the University of New Brunswick (1987), Queen's University (1989), the University of Calgary (2003), the University of Alberta (2005), and Mount Royal University (2010). In 2012, she was made an Officer of the Order of Canada.

Pollock has also held an amazing array of positions in local, provincial, and national theatre scenes. She was also writer-in-residence at the Regina Public Library; head of the Playwriting Lab at Sage Writing Experience, Saskatchewan; associate director and artistic director of Theatre Calgary and Theatre New Brunswick, as well as founding member and artistic director of the Performance Kitchen and the Garry Theatre, Calgary. She has also been president of Alberta Playwrights Network (APN) and director of Playwrights Lab (APN).

In 2008, when Sherrill Grace's Making Theatre: A Life of Sharon Pollock appeared, Pollock became the first woman in Canadian theatre history to have had a volume produced on her life and work. Pollock is also one of the few Canadian women playwrights to have had several collections of her plays published. Diane Bessai's Blood Relations and Other Plays ("Blood Relations," "One Tiger to a Hill," "Generations," "Whiskey Six Cadenza") appeared in 1981, and Cynthia Zimmerman has recently assembled twenty-two of Pollock's works into a three-volume set titled Sharon Pollock: Collected Works (2005, 2006, 2008).

Although most people at Pollock's age – she is now in her late seventies – would be winding down their careers, retirement does not seem to be a word in her vocabulary, as she continues to produce politically provocative plays. Remarkably, Pollock has also added several new positions to her extensive theatrical repertoire. Since 2006, she has served as dramaturge and artistic consultant for the Atlantic Ballet Theatre of Canada based in Moncton, New Brunswick, and from 2006 to 2008, she gathered a large following for her weekly reviews of Calgary theatre productions, titled "Pollock on Plays," for CBC Radio's The Homestretch.

In testament to the sustained attention paid to Pollock's work, six of the nine critical essays included in Sharon Pollock are by scholars who have never before written on the playwright. But the collection is also enriched by three essays from among the best-known scholars on Pollock's work to date (Sherrill Grace, Jerry Wasserman, and Cynthia Zimmerman), each of whom welcomed the opportunity to produce new critical assessments.

Jerry Wasserman's "Walsh and the (De)Construction of Canadian Myth" provides an excellent opening to Sharon Pollock. Wasserman's essay, written in an engaging personal style, explores the relationship between Sioux Chief Sitting Bull and James Walsh of the North West Mounted Police.

Shelley Scott's "Sharon Pollock and the Scene of the Crime" focuses on a curiously neglected area of Pollock's work. Scott analyzes Blood Relations, which remains the most frequently produced of Pollock's plays; Constance, which has received scant critical attention; and the later works End Dream and Saucy Jack, in order to demonstrate that Pollock adheres much more closely to the conventions of the genre than critics have acknowledged in the past.

Like Scott, whose essay offers a cogent reconsideration of previous critical assessments of Pollock's mystery plays, Jason Wiens challenges traditional readings of one of Pollock's early political prairie plays in his essay. In "Ownership and Stewardship in Sharon Pollock's Generations," Wiens offers a refreshing consideration of this work by drawing attention to the extent to which Pollock has often chronicled the events of her day, but with perhaps unacknowledged foresight.

In "Different Directions: Sharon Pollock's Doc," Cynthia Zimmerman examines another of Pollock's important early works in order to express her frustration with audiences and critics who have often placed their sympathies with either of the parents in the play, that is, with Everett Chalmers, the famous doctor, or with Bob, his neglected alcoholic wife. Zimmerman believes that the story of Catherine, the daughter caught between two warring parents, has been sidelined and hence requires more examination.

In "`The art a seein' the multiple realities': Fragmented Scenography in Sharon Pollock's Plays," Wes D. Pearce identifies another neglected aspect of Pollock's work. He asserts that critics' tendencies to focus on the "political and/or historical underpinnings of her plays," have led them to ignore Pollock's use of scenography, which plays a crucial role in how she "creates, writes, and dramatizes." Like Scott, Pearce examines several texts – Walsh, The Komagata Mara Incident, Generations, Whiskey Six Cadenza, and Doc – to demonstrate how Pollock's use of scenography has developed over time.

The next two essays in Sharon Pollock return to Pollock's interest in history; both examine Fair Liberty's Call, which explores the migration of the United Empire Loyalists to the Maritimes after the American War of Independence, and which critics have also tended to overlook. In "Listening is Telling: Eddie Roberts's Poetics of Repair in Sharon Pollock's Fair Liberty's Call," Carmen Derkson once again turns to an examination of Pollock's ongoing concern with the marginalization of Aboriginal people.

Similarly, Kathy K. Y. Chung's "Loss and Mourning in Fair Liberty's Call" combines a perceptive reading of stage directions with an abundance of secondary sources on rites of mourning and loss in arguing that while the play highlights the ‘historic brutality and injustices’ that took place during Canada's past, it also emphasizes that the well-being of a community and nation depends on the recognition and support of all its members' losses and suffering, including those of its indigenous peoples.

The final two essays, which offer textual analysis, are the first to comment on Man Out of Joint (2007); both reveal that while Pollock has played a major role in informing Canadians about shocking events in Canadian history, she is also keenly attuned to current injustices. In "Questions of Collective Responsibility in Sharon Pollock's Man Out of Joint," Tanya Schaap finds that the play, which chronicles the abuse of detainees at Guantanamo Bay as well as the controversies surrounding 9/11 conspiracy theories, functions stylistically and thematically as a ‘trauma narrative.’ Coates's "Equal-Opportunity Torturers in Judith Thompson's Palace of the End and Sharon Pollock's Man Out of Joint" concentrates on the representation of ‘torture chicks’ in these two works. The remaining entries move Sharon Pollock in a different direction – that is, to the recognition of Pollock's contribution to theatre production, to the making of theatre – hence providing a worthy balance to the essays on textual semiotics. In "Sharon Pollock and the Garry Theatre (1992–97)," Toronto theatre critic Martin Morrow looks back at the years he spent reviewing theatre productions for the Calgary Herald, and specifically those at the Garry Theatre, which Pollock ran with her son Kirk, a.k.a. K. C. Campbell. He concludes it was ‘remarkable’ that the pair managed to keep the company afloat without public funding for five years. The next essay, "Sharon Pollock in Kosovo," is one that Coates, as editor, invited Kosovar playwright and executive director of Qendra Multimedia, Pristina, Jeton Neziraj to write.

In "Biography and the Archive," Sherrill Grace explores some of the challenges biographers face, including their attempts to achieve the impossible task of getting their subject's story ‘right. Grace concludes her essay by filling in the details of Pollock's life since 2008, affirming that not a moment is dull or wasted in her subject's life.

Grace's essay is followed by "Sharon's Tongue," a new play that again substantiates the kind of impact Pollock has had on the local theatre community. Sharon Pollock concludes with a sampling of Pollock's CBC radio reviews, which were always skillfully researched, fair, and delivered with frankness and humor.

Pollock's contributions to Canadian theatre are indisputable – not only as a playwright but also a director, actor, mentor, and educator. This collection reminds us of the wide range of social, political, and historical subjects she has interrogated, and the imaginative theatricality of her work.... It brings together essays by established Pollock scholars and emerging scholars, whose diverse theoretical approaches further illuminate the plays and extend the analysis into a wider socio-political arena. – Anne Nothof, editor of Sharon Pollock: Essays on Her Works

That so many of the essays in Sharon Pollock refer to previously disregarded areas, even on works that have been critically examined many times in the past, speaks to the complexity of Pollock's plays and suggests that, even with the addition of this new collection to the existing body of criticism on her opus, there remains much work to be done. The inclusion of Pollock's reviews should serve to inspire future research on her contribution to the making of theatre as critic.

Arts & Media / Travel / Cultural & Social History

Magazines, Travel, and Middlebrow Culture: Canadian Periodicals in English and French, 1925-1960 by Faye Hammill & Michelle Smith (The University of Alberta Press)

Where did you go last year, when the winter winds blew? – Mayfair, 1935

As commercial magazines began to flourish in the 1920s, they promoted an expanding network of luxury railway hotels and transatlantic liner routes. The leading monthlies – among them Mayfair, Chatelaine, and La Revue Moderne – presented travel as both a mode of self-improvement and a way of negotiating national identity. Magazines, Travel, and Middlebrow Culture announces a new cross-cultural approach to periodical studies, reading both French- and English-language magazines in relation to an emerging transatlantic middlebrow culture.

Hammill is professor of English at the University of Strathclyde in the UK and formerly worked at Cardiff University and the University of Liverpool. She is a former editor of the British Journal of Canadian Studies. Smith, a writer, has also served as a Lecturer in English and Creative Writing at the University of Strathclyde.

A century ago, the golden age of magazine publishing coincided with the beginning of a golden age of travel. Magazines, Travel, and Middlebrow Culture centers on Canada, where commercial magazines began to flourish in the 1920s alongside an expanding network of luxury railway hotels and ocean liner routes. Hammill and Smith suggest that magazines, by circulating fantasies of travel, were instrumental in forging a link between geographical mobility and upward mobility. They constructed travel as an opportunity to acquire knowledge and prestige as well as to experience pleasure and luxury. And in their repeating patterns and seasonal cycles, the periodicals themselves replicate the experience of travel: the familiar movements and set itineraries, as well as the new discoveries and visual pleasures.

The frothy Mayfair had been established in 1927, yet its owner, Maclean Publishing, was already on the point of announcing another new magazine. Chatelaine, launched in May 1928, took a more serious tone, committing itself to national advancement and to serving the needs of Canadian women. The new titles joined four other mainstream Canadian magazines, Maclean's, La Revue Moderne, the Canadian Home journal, and La Revue Populaire, which had started publishing in the first two decades of the century and were beginning to transform themselves and expand their circulation.

These six magazines were the most widely read in Canada in an era when print was the dominant form of mass media. Their rise kept pace with the growing urban, professional class, who sought out such periodicals for advice, information, and entertainment. They maintained their leading positions well into the 1950s, and three have survived into the present. Yet they are hardly ever discussed, and their histories are almost unknown. These magazines are important because they illuminate the relationships amongst nationalism, consumerism, and print culture, three defining features of the last century. The ways in which they addressed their intended audience tell us about an emerging demographic that still defines the norm in Canada: white, middle-class, and aspirational. Their contents tell us about gender divisions that continue to determine contemporary social structures, and their advertisements tell us about the development of consumerism and its role in modern print culture. The fiction and poetry they circulated tell us about shared ideals and value systems, while the disappearance of many of their authors from literary history hints at cultural hierarchies that came into play as the magazines went into decline. In their pages, images of travel and cosmopolitanism are continually set against ideals of nation and domesticity.

Magazines, Travel, and Middlebrow Culture is sorely needed, since the mainstream magazine has so far received even less critical analysis than other genres of Canadian periodical. The archive of mainstream magazines has, in general, been explored only by researchers aiming to locate contributions by major literary authors. This book concentrates on interrelationships between form and content in the chosen magazines. Hammill and Smith

The six magazines Hammill and Smith chose to focus on are sufficiently similar to be discussed as a group or genre, yet each one developed its own distinctive identity. Their audiences overlapped, but were not identical, since they variously addressed English- and French-speaking Canadians, female, male, and family audiences, and class fractions ranging from upper class to lower middle class. Both the general interest Maclean's (launched as a monthly in 1911 before becoming a fortnightly and then a weekly news magazine in the 1960s), and the women's magazine Chatelaine (established 1928) are still thriving under these titles; the lifetime of the others corresponds roughly to the decades covered by Magazines, Travel, and Middlebrow Culture.

Hammill and Smith devote somewhat less space to Francophone than to Anglophone material because there were only two large mainstream magazines in French during the period they focus on, and because they did not cover travel quite as extensively as some of the English-language titles did. Yet their research has always been conceived in terms of cross-cultural reading. They find it highly productive to bring the two sets of magazines into the same framework of analysis, exploring their joint engagement with, for instance, middle-class aspiration, modern consumerism, and American cultural imperialism, while acknowledging their different orientations towards questions of nationalism and cultural belonging.

Magazines, Travel, and Middlebrow Culture emerged from a larger project, `Magazines, Travel and Middlebrow Culture in Canada, 1925-1960,' on which a number of scholars have collaborated. While Hammill and Smith say they have read through a very large amount of magazine content, they could discuss only a tiny fraction of that content in detail. Magazines, Travel, and Middlebrow Culture, then, should be considered as an opening statement rather than a comprehensive or final account.

The first two chapters of Magazines, Travel, and Middlebrow Culture concentrate on the magazine as a material object in a marketplace, while the third and fourth chapters explore some of the themes which dominated the magazines' content. The subject of travel therefore becomes increasingly prominent as the chapters succeed one another, while the notion of middlebrow culture frames the discussion throughout. The amount of attention given to each magazine, and to each period of its history, varies in proportion to the extent of its coverage of travel and related topics.

‘Chapter One: Marketplace’ delineates the mainstream magazine marketplace in Canada over the period from the 1920s until the 1950s. It explores pricing, circulation, and the important role of advertising, which increasingly financed the magazines as well as enabling them to shape and address their target audiences. The chapter also examines the nationalist orientation of the magazines, and the ways in which they differentiated themselves from one another and from their foreign competitors. It concludes with a concise history of each of the magazines, with detail on their changing formats, their most influential editors and contributors, and the type of travel material they included. Given the dearth of information on these six titles, this chapter on its own represents a substantial addition to North American periodical history.

‘Chapter Two: Pages’ examines the relationship between the physical characteristics of the magazines and the type of material they published. They call for `new theoretical models and methodologies' to make sense of the `radically transforming print ecology' of the late Victorian and modern eras. Moving from detailed dissection of individual pages and single issues up towards broader surveys of an annual volume and of a full run, they demonstrate the different types of insight which each level of analysis makes possible. A close reading of a page or issue tells important things about the interaction of adjacent items, but nothing about the way that periodicals situate themselves in time – by, for instance, pointing towards past or future issues. A more `distant' method, surveying a year or several decades' worth of issues, reveals larger patterns but blurs the detail and relies on generalizations which can never take full account of all the data.

‘Chapter Three: Fashions’ considers not only the magazines' association of fashionable clothes with mobility and the exotic, but also their presentation, if travel itself as a fashionable practice. The chapter offers close readings of different types of fashion report, ranging from the `Paris Letters' of the 1920s to the staged photo shoots, taken on location, which featured in the 1950s. They argue that it is in their fashion writing, with its conceptual vocabulary of newness, authenticity, originality, difficulty, and eccentricity, that the magazines engaged most closely with discourses of modernism. The fashion journalism in the magazines was framed by advertising for clothing and beauty products, and their discussion of the relationship between these editorial and commercial materials prepares the way for ‘Chapter Four: Consumers.’ This chapter focuses on the magazines' construction of travel as an opportunity for consumption, a chance to experience luxury as well as to accumulate social and cultural capital. The aspirational figure of the traveler-consumer was constructed through collaboration between fiction authors, travel writers, advertisers, and editors. Fantasies of mobility, they argue, were used to sell not only trips and holidays, but also consumer products and, indeed, copies of the magazines themselves. For readers who could not afford a trip across the Atlantic or across Canada, these glossy, illustrated periodicals offered proxy access to the glamour and prestige of travel.

 'Don’t you get tired of just reading about things?' the frustrated traveler George Bailey is asked in It’s A Wonderful Life. Bailey, like the film audience, accepted he could never get away. So, they dreamed.... To read Magazines, Travel, and Middlebrow Culture is to revisit an era when Middle Canada worked a six-day week and fantasized about the fine things in life. – Holly Doan Blacklock's Reporter

A major contribution to Canadian studies and the study of print culture in a North American context. This volume should prove useful to scholars in a wide range of fields, including cultural and social history, publishing, literary studies, cultural studies, and communications. – Dr. Gillian Roberts, University of Nottingham

Magazines, Travel, and Middlebrow Culture is the first book focusing on neglected Canadian middlebrow culture, connecting magazine publishing with themes of travel. Students and scholars of Canadian studies, cultural and social history, publishing, literary studies, cultural studies, communications studies, and print culture will find Magazines, Travel, and Middlebrow Culture, a first in Canadian middlebrow culture, a must-have on their shelf.

Arts & Photography / Photography

The Soft Touch: A Photographer's Guide to Manipulating Focus by Jim Cornfield (Amherst Media)

Image sharpness is one of photography’s yin/yang propositions. Soft focus can impair a photograph, but just as readily enhance it. Blurs and soft zones function like shadows and highlights; they minimize certain details in the image and redirect a viewer’s attention within the frame. “Like the rest stops in a piece of music,” writes acclaimed photo-educator author Jim Cornfield in The Soft Touch, “creatively manipulated softness can empower a photograph’s impact.”
There are countless ways to selectively modulate sharpness in an image. This veteran commercial photographer reveals his personal choices for using soft focus. “It’s not just eye candy,” he writes, “it can also add great depth and meaning to an image.”
In The Soft Touch readers learn the background of soft-focus photography, historical and technical – the use of spherical aberration and circles of confusion. More importantly, The Soft Touch reveals a wealth of image manipulation techniques for creating amazing, evocative effects both in camera and in the digital darkroom. Included is a bonus chapter featuring the work of three noted contemporary fine art shooters who use soft-focus and diffusion with stunning, gallery quality results.

Jim Cornfield is a veteran commercial photographer, freelance journalist, and travel writer, based in Malibu Canyon, CA. As a writer, his adventure and eco-travel articles are widely published in magazines, including Scientific American, Continental Airlines magazine, and NY-based Rangefinder, for which Cornfield is a columnist and regular contributor of photo-related feature stories. Cornfield is an experienced film and video director, having created many television commercials for his broadcasting and advertising clients.

In The Soft Touch, Cornfield takes readers step-by-step through a diverse range of approaches to maximizing this underrated tool.

Photographers learn:

  • How to manipulate depth of field and bokeh.
  • How to enhance mood with haze and halos.
  • Portrait, wedding, boudoir, and commercial photography techniques.
  • Pro tips from Susan Burnstine, Michael Crouser, and Bobbie Goodrich.

Jim's prose pulls you in and keeps you engaged while he skillfully slips in all the complicated technical elements in a way that is easily digested. – Jacqueline Tobin, Editor-in-chief of Rangefinder magazine

He brings intelligence and originality to his photographs and to every subject he's covered in his books and hundreds of magazine articles. – Ellen Boughn, founder of After Image Photo Agency

Pay very close attention to anything Jim has to say about photography. – Harold Davis, photographer, author, teacher

The Soft Touch is great inspiration for readers to augment their photographic repertoires, their artistic personas and their client lists.

Audio / Religion & Spirituality / Meditation

Meditation in Seven Steps: Unlocking the Depths of Human Fulfillment Audio CD – Audiobook, 2 CDs, running time: 2 hours, 29 minutes by Reginald A. Ray PhD (Sounds True)

Meditation is a pathway to the depths of human fulfillment, so says Reginald A. Ray in Meditation in Seven Steps.

Like a tightly closed bud that longs to open fully, humans live on the verge of an unfathomable fullness and beauty that needs only their loving attention to begin to unfold. Meditation gives them a springboard for taking the bold leap into the limitless space of their own incredible lives.

Dr. Ray has been immersed in the practice and teaching of meditation for more than 40 years. Ray is the cofounder and spiritual director of Dharma Ocean Foundation, dedicated to the practice, study, and preservation of the teachings of Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche. The author of several books including Touching Enlightenment, he lives in Crestone, Colorado.

Meditation in Seven Steps brings listeners a distillation of this internationally respected teacher's most essential guidance for those new to the practice, covering the body and posture, breathing, relaxation, and mindfulness.

Meditation in Seven Steps explores:

  • Meditation as the antidote to distraction, confusion, and despair.
  • Seven progressive guided meditations.
  • The key aspects of practice – including posture, relaxation, mindfulness of the body and breath, and working with thoughts.
  • Shedding the layers of ‘ego mind’ to access one’s boundless nature.

"No matter our age, circumstances, or where we come from," explains Ray, "the practice of meditation enables us to make the journey back to who we truly are." With Meditation in Seven Steps, listeners experience freedom, joy, fulfillment, and the countless profound rewards of dedicated practice.

Business & Investing / Management & Leadership

Why Should Anyone Be Led by You?: What It Takes To Be An Authentic Leader by Robert Goffee & Gareth Jones (Harvard Business Review Press) (February 2006)

When leadership experts Rob Goffee and Gareth Jones in 2006 in Why Should Anyone Be Led by You? asserted that authenticity is a necessary condition for effective leadership, they urged existing and aspiring leaders to "be themselves – more – with skill". The message resonated throughout the business world but some astute individuals responded, "I will be an authentic leader when my organization is authentic". In that book, Goffee and Jones drew from extensive research to reveal how to hone and deploy one’s unique leadership assets while managing the inherent tensions at the heart of successful leadership: showing emotion and withholding it, getting close to followers while keeping distance, and maintaining individuality while ‘conforming enough.’

Goffee is Emeritus Professor of Organisational Behaviour at London Business School, where he teaches in the world-renowned Senior Executive Programme. Jones is a Fellow of the Centre for Management Development at London Business School and a visiting professor at Spain’s IE Business School in Madrid.

Why Should Anyone Be Led by You? argued that leaders don’t become great by aspiring to a list of universal character traits. Rather, effective leaders are authentic: they deploy individual strengths to engage followers’ hearts, minds, and souls. They are skillful at consistently being themselves, even as they alter their behaviors to respond effectively in changing contexts. What organizations need – and what followers want – they said, are authentic leaders who know who they are, where the organization needs to go, and how to convince followers to help them take it there.

Why Should Anyone Be Led by You? showed how great leaders essentially act as ‘authentic chameleons’: consistently displaying their true selves throughout the changes of contexts that require them to play a variety of roles.

But the comment still stands: "I will be an authentic leader when my organization is authentic".

So now, along comes the sequel: Why Should Anyone Work Here?.

Business & Investing / Management & Leadership

Why Should Anyone Work Here?: What It Takes to Create an Authentic Organization by Rob Goffee & Gareth Jones (Harvard Business Review Press) (Nov 2015)

Now in 2015, the world of work is changing and organizations must take this challenge very seriously.

So what does it take to create an authentic organization? What qualities are people looking for, and how does one build the workplace of people's dreams?

In this powerful and necessary follow-up to the classic Why Should Anyone Be Led by You?, leadership and organizational sages Rob Goffee and Gareth Jones identify and illuminate the six key organizational attributes that enable organizations to become authentic. With vivid examples from global companies, the authors illustrate the kind of strong, attractive workplace culture that leads to sustained high performance. They also provide ways of assessing how a company is doing and describe the tensions and trade-offs that leaders must manage as they transform their organizations.

In Why Should Anyone Work Here? Goffee and Jones identify the workplace characteristics which allow and encourage workers to be their best selves. They examine six key attributes that enable organizations to create DREAMS:

  • Difference – let people be themselves.
  • Radical honesty – communicate what's really going on.
  • Extra value – magnify people's strengths.
  • Authenticity – stand for something real.
  • Meaning – create satisfying work.
  • Simple rules – reduce the clutter and make things clear.

Goffee and Jones show how organizations can create a thriving workplace culture that attracts and retains the right people, and leads to sustained high performance. They provide tools to help assess how one’s own organization is doing and describe the tensions and trade-offs that leaders must manage. Exploring the successes and learnings of such diverse organizations as Unilever, New York Life, Novo Nordisk, McDonald's, and others, the authors acknowledge that excellence in all six attributes is a huge challenge. Several of the imperatives run counter to traditional practices; others are complicated and costly to implement. The practical challenges are huge. But building better workplaces is not an alternative to, but rather a means for, responding to the new challenges of capitalism, for building productivity, unleashing creativity, and winning.

When Rob Goffee and Gareth Jones wrote Why Should Anyone Be Led by You?, it became a bestseller… This new book, Why Should Anyone Work Here? … builds on that previous work. – The Financial Times
… six research-based and action-oriented keys for practicing authenticity, nurturing people and succeeding with the fundamentally social challenges of leadership
. – David Slocum, FORBES
Goffee and Jones have a knack for asking the right questions at the right time. The workplace as we know it is broken, and no amount of personal, ‘authentic’ leadership is going to fix it. A primer on what it will take to build organizations where people can truly be their best, this book is a must-read for anyone concerned with attracting the best talent and fostering their creativity
. – Herminia Ibarra, professor, INSEAD; author, Act Like a Leader, Think Like a Leader
A great sequel to
Why Should Anyone Be Led by You?, this book lifts the discussions about authentic leadership and what makes for the best possible organization to a new level. A must-read for all CEOs. – Franz Humer, Chairman, Diageo; former Chairman, F. Hoffmann-LaRoche
If you were to design the best workplace on earth, what would it look like? You can find the answers to this question in this wonderful book. Why Should Anyone Work Here? is full of inspiring examples, intellectual wisdom, and practical advice on how to design an organization that brings out the best in its people. It is bound to become required reading for any senior executive. – Costas Markides, professor, London Business School
The combination of the right products with the right people drives a brand’s success. After showing that leadership is not given but earned in Why Should Anyone Be Led by You?, Goffee and Jones now demonstrate that to complete the equation, a leader must build and shape the right organizational culture to stimulate creativity and ensure long-term success. – Chantal Gaemperle, LVMH Group Executive Vice President, Human Resources and Synergies
Goffee and Jones have taught us much in the last two decades about how to be outstanding leaders. And it is our job as leaders to create the distinctive cultures that will attract and foster talent and leadership. In this book, they show us how to do this, clearly demonstrating, as no one has before, the key importance of a few simple cultural traits in order for companies to be great. – Belmiro de Azevedo, former Chairman and CEO, Sonae

Why Should Anyone Work Here? is the question all contemporary organizational leaders must constantly ask themselves if they want to survive and thrive in the new world. This timely book, full of vivid stories and examples, will help them answer that question.
Crafts & Hobbies / Cars

Streamlined: Classic Cars of the 20th Century by Malte Jürgens, with photography by Michel Zumbrunn (Schiffer Publishing, Ltd)

There was something in the air.

The ultimately very successful book and magazine publisher Paul Pietsch, born in 1911, began his career as a race car driver, just as streamlined design itself was starting its own career. For him, this design is inextricably linked with the golden age of motor sports. – from the book

In 2009, the Prototyp car museum in Hamburg, Germany, organized a special two-month exhibit where 25 classic, streamlined automobiles had an unprecedented ‘aerodynamic rendezvous.’ The exhibition included such automotive gems as the 1940 BMW Mille Miglia Touring Coupe, the 1977 Mercedes-Benz C111/III, Porsche's 356 Pre-A coupe of 1950, Petermax Müller's 1938 World Record Volkswagen, Das Auto magazine founder Paul Pietsch's 1952 Avus Coupe, and the Kamm K3 from 1938 – and documented it with photography.

At that special exhibit, unlike anything ever presented to date, either in Germany or anywhere else in the world, for two months, 23 streamlined automobiles, the body of a record-setting car, and a revolutionary model wind tunnel, all had their aerodynamic rendezvous. The result is Streamlined, an unparalleled artistic documentation of the history of the aerodynamically optimized automobile.

Patricia Sholten, daughter of Paul Pietsch, and the Stuttgart Motorbuch Verlag which she runs, commissioned the Zurich photographer Michel Zumbrunn, who specializes in classic cars, to photograph this unique exhibition of never-before-shown-together streamlined works of art in his own unique style. This created an artistic documentation of unparalleled magic: this history of the streamlined automobile is not illustrated with the black and white photos of former times, used in the relevant books again and again due to the lack of new images; it is illustrated with a portfolio of photographic art by Zumbrunn and his co-photographer Urs Schmid.

Wolfgang Seidl, who designed Streamlined, book, text, and images, is someone always fascinated anew by the theme of automobiles and graphics, and who would have preferred to put his latest work into the wind tunnel, to test his creative design ideas. Many aspects of the pertinent theory are based on the fundamental literature on streamlining: The writings of Paul Jarays, the four-volume Aerodynamik des Kraftfahrzeugs [Motor Vehicle Aerodynamics] by Reinhard Von Koenig-Fachsenfeld, the important works on streamlining by Ralf Kieselbach, and the wonderful catalog by Lichtenstein and Engler for the Zurich exhibition on "Streamlinedform [Streamline Design]."

… I am happy that Motorbuch-Verlag of Stuttgart, which I founded, is now publishing this wonderfully photographed book [Streamlined] on streamlined automobiles. It reminds me of the golden age of great motor sports, which I was able to experience and savor as an active driver myself. It is wonderful to be able to find here again my streamlined Meteor of old, rebuilt by skilled experts, which will today interest classic car enthusiasts around the world as a high point of technology and style. I hope that when you read and look through this book, you will get the same pleasure that I felt. – Paul Pietsch, Stuttgart, March 2012, from the foreword

Streamlined is a unique book, likely never to be produced again, a liber delectationis, a work created by the passion for classic cars and the concept of streamlining. Anyone with a passion for classic cars and the science of aerodynamics will revel in these gorgeous images coupled with historical and technical information based on research by renowned experts.

History / Social

Benjamin West and the Struggle to be Modern by Loyd Grossman (Merrell Publishers)

At the time of his death in 1820, Benjamin West was the most famous artist in the English-speaking world, and much admired throughout Europe. From humble beginnings in Pennsylvania, he had become the first American artist to study in Italy, and within a few short years of his arrival in London, was instrumental in the foundation of the Royal Academy of Arts (he succeeded Sir Joshua Reynolds to become its second President) and became history painter to King George III. In his lifetime, West’s meteoric rise to prominence and the great pleasure he took in his success attracted criticism, and his posthumous reputation took a savage mauling from Victorian critics, one of whom dubbed him ‘The Monarch of Mediocrity’. But even at his critical nadir, West’s most celebrated work, The Death of General Wolfe, commemorating the British victory at the Battle of Quebec in 1759 and first exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1771, continued to fascinate. Although it was not, as is sometimes claimed, the first history painting to feature contemporary costume, it was the first picture in such a vein to become a critical and popular success in Britain.
West remains today the most neglected and misunderstood of Britain’s great eighteenth-century artists, lacking the social bite of Hogarth, the bravura of Reynolds or the easy elegance of Gainsborough. Nor was he a forceful writer (unlike Hogarth and Reynolds), and he did not possess the intellectual credentials to which so many of his fellow artists aspired. And yet, as Loyd Grossman asserts in Benjamin West and the Struggle to be Modern, West was extraordinarily in tune with the artistic and intellectual currents that swirled through his turbulent times.

Grossman OBE, a broadcaster, historian and journalist, has presented a wide range of TV programs. Born in Massachusetts, Grossman has been based in the UK since 1975. He is Chairman of the Heritage Alliance, Chairman of the Churches Conservation Trust and President of the National Association of Decorative and Fine Arts Societies (NADFAS). According to Grossman, West was in the vanguard of both Neoclassicism and Romanticism, and among the very first artists to give visual expression to the exciting and heroic qualities of contemporary events, as opposed to episodes dredged up from the biblical, classical or mythological past, which had long enjoyed the highest artistic status. West’s Wolfe was painted at a time when Europeans were just beginning to abandon the tendency to look backwards. Men and women of letters, philosophers and historians were increasingly convinced that modernity could equal and even surpass the achievements of the ancient Greeks and Romans. This newfound ability to believe in the value of the present and to look forward to a progressive future is very much the foundation of the ‘modern’ attitude that has affected the way we live and think ever since.
While acknowledging that West’s reputation is still precarious, Grossman in Benjamin West and the Struggle to be Modern explains why Wolfe was such an instant success and why The Death of General Wolfe continues to exercise such a strong grip on our imaginations nearly 250 years after it was first shown to the public. He situates West in the midst of Enlightenment thinking about history and modernity, and seeks to demolish some of the prejudices about the talent and intentions of the young man from the Pennsylvania frontier who attained such eminence at the British court.

When he painted Wolfe in 1770, West helped to change the course of art. In Benjamin West and the Struggle to be Modern, Grossman explores how, through its depiction of a heroic contemporary event, one of the eighteenth century's most iconic artworks gave visual expression to Enlightenment ideas about history and progress, and laid the foundations of a modern attitude.

West's reputation has slowly recovered following a rise in interest in the late 1930s around the bicentenary of his birth and the publication in 1986 of Helmut von Erffa and Allen Staley's monumental catalogue raisonne. In more recent years a growing number of art historians – including most prominently Jules Prown and David Soicin – have contributed to the reassessment of West's accomplishments.

Loyd Grossman's fascination with Benjamin West's Death of General Wolfe provides a wonderfully rich study, not just of the painter and his work, but above all of a great social, political and intellectual tipping point in art. – Antony Beevor

An admirable, up-to-date and wide-ranging account, making clear how important West was, not just as the first American artist to make a career in London, but also as an artist who first introduced ideas of the Enlightenment to history painting. – Charles Saumarez Smith, Secretary and Chief, Executive of The Royal Academy of Arts, London

Benjamin West and the Struggle to be Modern, an enlightening and engaging work, contributes to the rehabilitation of West's still-precarious reputation. It helps readers understand and consequently explain why Wolfe was such an instant success. It demolishes some of the prejudices about the talent and intentions of the young man from the Pennsylvania frontier who attained such eminence at the court of George III.

History / War / Biographies & Memoirs

The Lion of Sabray: The Afghani Warrior Who Defied the Taliban and Saved the Life of Navy SEAL Marcus Luttrell by Patrick Robinson (Touchstone)

Patrick Robinson, coauthor of the #1 New York Times bestseller Lone Survivor shares the gripping untold story of Mohammed Gulab, the Pashtun warrior who defied the Taliban and saved the life of American hero and Navy SEAL Marcus Luttrell.
Robinson helped Luttrell bring his harrowing story of survival to the page and the big screen. But the Afghani man who saved his life was always shrouded in mystery. Now, with The Lion of Sabray, Robinson reveals the amazing back-story of Mohammed Gulab – the brave man who forever changed the course of life for his Afghan family, his village, and himself when he discovered Luttrell badly injured and barely conscious on a mountainside in the Hindu Kush just hours after the firefight that killed the rest of Luttrell’s team.
Operating under the 2,000-year-old principles of Pashtunwali – the tribal honor code that guided his life – Gulab refused to turn Luttrell over to the Taliban forces that were hunting him, believing it was his obligation to protect and care for the American soldier. Because Gulab was a celebrated Mujahedeen field commander and machine-gunner who beat back the Soviets as a teenager, the Taliban were wary enough that they didn’t simply storm the village and take Luttrell, which gave Gulab time to orchestrate his rescue.
In addition to Gulab’s story, The Lion of Sabray cinematically reveals previously unknown details of Luttrell’s rescue by American forces – which were only recently declassified – and sheds light on the ramifications for Gulab, his family, and his community.

Robinson, in addition to coauthoring Lone Survivor, is also the author of seven internationally bestselling suspense thrillers, including Intercept, Diamondhead, To the Death, and The Delta Solution, as well as several nonfiction bestsellers, including the coauthored New York Times bestseller, A Colossal Failure of Common Sense: The Inside Story of the Collapse of Lehman Brothers.

More than a companion piece to Lone Survivor, The Lion of Sabray fills in much that Luttrell had no way of knowing when he was writing his book. Luttrell wasn't able to verbally communicate with Gulab at all, as neither spoke the other's language. Gulab's amazing back-story only came to light during the filming of the movie, when he was flown to the U.S. to consult. Several months later, Luttrell again flew Gulab to Texas where Robinson awaited him. Together they worked on the book, a translator from the Hindu Kush the conduit of the tribesman's epic story. The Lion of Sabray also details the complicated, near-impossible operation to save Luttrell, information not included in the Lone Survivor book or film because it was still classified.

Gulab, a celebrated Mujahedeen field commander and respected village leader known as ‘The Lion,’ discovered the barely conscious and badly injured Luttrell on a mountainside in the Hindu Kush just hours after the firefight. Gulab endangered everything and everyone he held dear in order to protect and care for the SEAL. The Taliban vowed to kill him and all of his family, but Gulab would not give in and held them off – always with his own Kalashnikov at the ready – long enough to orchestrate Luttrell's rescue.

The Lion of Sabray reads like an edge-of-your-seat thriller filled with danger; bravery, and stunning selflessness and is, above all, a must-read story of an unlikely friendship forged across political, spiritual, cultural, and linguistic barriers. As Robinson states at the conclusion of The Lion of Sabray, "Mohammed Gulab is a proud and dignified man. His story bespeaks a rare nobility. This book is written to afford him the utmost respect."

No one does it better. Not even Tom Clancy. – Carlo D'Este, author of Patton: A Genius for War
Robinson is one of the Crown Princes of the beach read thriller
. – Stephen Coonts
Robinson is quickly replacing Tom Clancy as the preeminent writer of modern naval fiction. – Florida Times Union

In this follow-up [to Lone Survivor], Robinson shares the equally remarkable story of Gulab, who saved Luttrell and nursed him back to life while protecting him from Taliban attackers. Fans of Robinson's previous book will find this an insightful and inspiring companion piece. – Publishers Weekly, starred review

The depiction of Afghan life along the Pakistan border may help to break stereotypes of an often misunderstood culture.... For those who enjoyed Lone Survivor. – Library Journal, Edwin Burgess, U.S. Army Combined Arms Research Lib., Fort Leavenworth, KS

A gung-ho yarn of modern war that also clarifies the resilience of Afghanistan's tribal culture. – Kirkus Reviews

Going beyond both the book and the movie versions of Lone Survivor, The Lion of Sabray, is a gripping, untold story, a must-read for anyone who wants to know more about the brave man who helped the Lone Survivor make it home.

Humanities / Psychology & Counseling

Let's Talk About Death: Asking the Questions that Profoundly Change the Way We Live and Die by Steve Gordon & Irene Kacandes (Prometheus Books)

Experts in end-of-life care tell us that we should talk about death and dying with relatives and friends, but how do we get such conversations off the ground in a society that historically has avoided the topic? Let's Talk About Death provides one example of such a conversation. Coauthors Steve Gordon and Irene Kacandes take up challenging questions about pain, caregiving, grief, and what comes after death. Gordon and Kacandes share the results of a no-holds-barred discussion they conducted for several years over email. Readers can consider a range of views on complicated issues to which there are no ‘right’ answers.

Gordon, formerly a newspaper writer and editor, is a massage therapist and the founder, executive director, and primary massage therapist for a nonprofit program called The Hand to Heart Project, which provides free in-home massage and compassionate touch to people with advanced cancer, including people in treatment as well as people nearing the end of life. Kacandes is the Dartmouth Professor of German Studies and Comparative Literature at Dartmouth College, where she is also involved in the Medical Humanities Initiative.

At the heart of Let's Talk About Death is an unusual friendship that has its roots in murder and in a spring walk through a quiet neighborhood in a small New Hampshire town in the Upper Valley of the Connecticut River. That friendship developed through a long and frank dialogue between a college professor and a massage therapist, two average individuals, who chose to explore mortality together though neither was facing imminent death.

In late January 2001, Kacandes, her friends, and quickly the whole community learned that Susanne and Half Zantop, also professors at the college, had been murdered in their home. The perpetrators had escaped without being seen, and a long, agonizing police investigation accompanied the stunned grieving of all who knew and loved the Zantops, including Kacandes.

In early January 2002, as the one-year anniversary of the murders approached, Kacandes and other close friends of the Zantops decided to try to temper the inevitable renewed attention to the perpetrators – two local teenage thrill seekers who didn't even know the couple – and to instead commemorate their friends' lives. Kacandes and another friend volunteered to lead the effort and called Gordon, the Sunday editor of the region's daily newspaper, the Valley News. He agreed to publish the friends' stories and photos of the Zantops in the form that Kacandes and her friend were proposing. For Kacandes, his kindness and cooperation contrasted starkly with the exploitative intrusiveness of other journalists whom the family and friends of the Zantops had had to deal with in the wake of the murders.

Years later, Kacandes read in that same local newspaper an article about that same Steve Gordon: he had made a midlife career switch and was working full-time as a massage therapist. He also had founded a non-profit organization, The Hand to Heart Project, to give free massages to advanced cancer patients, including persons nearing death. Deeply impressed by both these actions, Kacandes sent off a donation to Hand to Heart.

When Gordon and Kacandes finally met face-to-face on April 26, 2011, to take a walk and discuss Being with Dying, they had already known of each other for more than nine years. After the walk, at a picnic table near Gordon's office, they extended the conversation to the topic of writing about end-of-life issues. Gordon was interested in passing on stories from the lives and deaths of people he had met through The Hand to Heart Project. Kacandes had been considering whether she needed to write more on trauma and sudden death. Back and forth their ideas went until one of them said: "Maybe it's a collaboration."

When sharing their writing with a larger audience through publica­tion became a reality, they decided to retain the original unfolding of their thoughts through e-mails exchanged over several years because it reflected not only their growing friendship but also the process they themselves had found so helpful to becoming more comfortable with discussing mortality: posing questions; offering answers; sharing things they'd read and daily experiences they were having; disagreeing with one another; and trying out a different idea by rewriting.

The e-mails comprising Let's Talk About Death date from July 2011, shortly after the two met in person and just after Kacandes had been caring for her very ill father, to February 2015, when Kacandes and Gordon were making final edits on their manuscript.

If the biggest obstacle to talking about mortality is getting a conversation going, then following how Kacandes and Gordon have done just that could be helpful to others.

Irene Kacandes and Steve Gordon have written a tender and beautiful book about a difficult subject borne out of the tragedy of a local murder that brought together this professor and massage therapist. On these pages, they share ‘conversations’ they had in the form of letters that enabled them to explore sickness and dying from both a personal and a philosophical point of view.... In this book, they share life’s meaning, and they also offer us a glimpse into their enviable friendship. – Dr. Erica Brown, educator and author, Happier Endings: A Meditation on Life and Death
This is what happens when two extraordinary letter writers enter into a lively and engaging dialogue about what it truly means to contemplate death and the loss of those they love – they create a thoroughly captivating and blessedly unsentimental conversation of unflinching honesty and compassion that can’t help but stir fellow seekers to take up the quest themselves
. – Lee Webster, president, National Home Funeral Alliance, and director, New Hampshire Funeral Resources, Education & Advocacy

Honest, probing, sensitive, and even humorous at times, the completely open discussions in Let's Talk About Death will help readers deal with a topic that most of us try to avoid but that everyone will face eventually.

Literature & Fiction / Mystery

The Vulture: An Ike Schwartz Mystery by Frederick Ramsay (Ike Schwartz Series: Poisoned Pen Press)

Marry new technology to old-fashioned policing and readers have something special. And that’s what they have in The Vulture.

The car is found just outside Picketsville, Virginia, a smoking ruin of twisted metal and shattered glass. It takes only a glance to confirm that this is Ike Schwartz’s car. Ever since he left the CIA, the incorruptible Picketsville sheriff has made enemies at home and abroad. Now, one has caught up with him, with a bomb powerful enough to turn quiet Main Street into a smoking crater. Is this a cop killing – or domestic terrorism? The town plunges into mourning, and Ike’s wife Ruth, the president of the local college, puts on a brave face as the sheriff’s department organizes a manhunt, the likes of which Picketsville has never seen. Back at the CIA, Ike’s old colleague Charlie Garland joins the hunt, becoming fixated on a blurry videotape of the crime scene. Charlie’s elastic job description includes monitoring Ike’s life.

In The Vulture, investigations – led by more than one player – fan around and out of Picketsville as far as a small town in Idaho where Martin Pangborn, head of the radical militia called the Fifty-First Star, runs his organization. If some banks and businesses are too big to fail, are some people too deeply connected or too wealthy to bring to justice? Is Martin Pangborn such a person?

The Fifty-First Star’s tentacles run long and deep. But the Vulture is something no one, not even Martin Pangborn, is prepared for.

Author Frederick Ramsay has published fourteen books that range from historicals (The Jerusalem Mysteries), to Africa (The Botswana Mysteries), to police procedurals (The Ike Schwartz Mysteries). In addition, his stand-alone Impulse was named one of the Best 100 Books of the Year in 2006 by Publishers Weekly.

Outdoors & Nature / Animals

Life Size Birds by Nancy J. Hajeski (Thunder Bay Press)

The birds that make their home in every corner of North America – both the neighborhood regulars and their less visible or more exotic cousins – are featured on the pages of Life Size Birds. In the book, full-size images of beautiful feathered friends offer a detailed look at each North American species, while scaled photographs of larger birds allow readers to see the entire animal. Fun facts pepper the pages, and a summary of general information accompanies each avian.

Bestselling author Nancy J. Hajeski has been a birder for decades – her passion has resulted in her traveling to remote areas to look for specific species, such as raptors or wading birds; birding at wildlife sanctuaries in Florida, New Jersey, and New York; attending birding seminars, workshops, and talks at birdwatcher meetings and garden clubs; and becoming a member of the National Audubon Society.

Life Size Birds provides:

  • Full-color photos of each bird in intricate detail.
  • More than 200 pages filled with stunning images, distribution maps, and fun facts.
  • Perspective on the actual size of each bird through scaled images.
  • Birds large and small from every corner of North America.
  • A pull-out poster of a majestic Bald Eagle in flight.

According to Life Size Birds, there are now more than 10,000 bird species in the world, found on all seven continents. Despite their delicate appearance, birds are hardy and tenacious. Extremes of temperature – blazing heat or freezing cold – do not faze them. They live and thrive on almost all types of terrain: snow fields, arctic tundra, desert wastes, volcanic slopes, coastal scrub, tropical rain forests, dense thickets, fetid swamps, burned-out woodlands, towering mountains, deep valleys, barren islands, rocky cliffs, wave-thrashed beaches, and far out to sea ... just about anywhere their wings can carry them. Because most birds do not avoid human habitations, they are frequently seen in orchards, farms, parks, suburban backyards, and noisy city streets.

They range in size from the 2-inch-long bee hummingbird, to the 8-foot-long ostrich, and to the wandering albatross with a wingspan of 11 feet. Birds eat almost everything – from tiny zooplankton to hard-shelled mollusks; from insects and arthropods to reptiles, amphibians, mammals, and other birds; from grain, seeds, fruit, berries, and sap to carrion and garbage.

According to Life Size Birds, birds exhibit a number of social behaviors – flocking, cooperative breeding, hunting, and mobbing predators. They use calls and songs, as well as visual signals and sound effects, to communicate. Some follow complex courtship rituals, and while many species are monogamous for one season or several years, a number of birds mate for life. Birds are also canny and shrewd, and some families, the crows and parrots especially, are extremely bright and have shown aptitude at using tools and solving problems. Birds are also able to transmit knowledge, including yearly migration routes, across generations.

North America, with a climate ranging from the arctic to the near tropical, is home to more than 900 naturally occurring wild species of birds. Many of those that migrate never have to leave the continent in order to find high-resource summer breeding grounds and warm winter havens. Other species remain year-round in one general territory that offers them food, nesting sites, and an amiable climate.

For the purposes of Life Size Birds, the entries have been broken down into the following categories cased on similarities and shared traits:

  • Hummingbirds are some of the smallest birds on the planet, and they constitute the family Trochilidae. Their name comes from the sound made by their rapidly beating wings, which produce frequencies audible to humans. They have the highest metabolism of any homeothermic animal.
  • Songbirds are part of the clade Passeri, the perching birds. They evolved 50 million years ago and there are now 4,000 species worldwide. These birds tend to be small to medium in size; they are often very social; and they are known for producing a variety of calls and songs. Even the raucous caw of the crow is considered a song.
  • Woodpeckers are sturdy, vivid birds with powerful bills and typically hunt for insects beneath tree bark. They belong to the family Picidae, along with sapsuckers, piculets, and wrynecks. There are about 200 species worldwide, many of them endangered due to loss of habitat.
  • Cuckoos are slender, medium-size birds, members of the family Cuculidae. Some species have a reputation for brood parasitism, laying their eggs in other birds' nests. Game birds are non-waterfowl birds that are hunted for food: thee category includes quail, grouse, pheasants, and turkeys. These often-reclusive denizens of the woodlands are typically tracked using specially bred dogs, such as pointers, setters, cocker spaniels, and Springer spaniels.
  • Goatsuckers, also known as nightjars, are nocturnal or crepuscular members of the family Caprimulgidae. Birds in this category include nighthawks and whip-poor-wills; they are known for their large eyes, small beaks, and excellent camouflage.
  • Birds of prey, also known as raptors, hunt and feed on other animals. They include the families Accipitridrae (hawks, eagles, harriers, Old World vultures), Pandionidae (ospreys), Falconidae (falcons), Cathartidae (New World vultures), Strigidae (typical owls), and Tytonidae (barn owls). These fierce predators hunt from the sky, either striking in midair or swooping down to attack on the ground, or seek carrion or carcasses on which to feed.
  • Waders are long-legged shorebirds that are found along rivers, lakes, and oceans, and sometimes in pastures. This category consists of herons, storks, egrets, snipes, bitterns, ibises, spoonbills, flamingos, sandpipers, rails, and plovers.
  • Waterbirds are flying, non-waterfowl birds that spend time in or on large bodies of water. These include gulls, terns, storm petrels, cormorants, kingfishers, puffins, and auklets.
  • Waterfowl encompasses the web-footed swimming birds of the family Anatidae. This group includes all ducks, geese, and swans, many of which are also hunted for food.

Life Size Birds is a handy identification guide to a variety of North American species and also a way to furnish images of the birds at their actual size. Novelty factor aside, it gives birders a means of comparison to other, similar birds, as well as offering a sense of the diminutive aspect of favorite songbirds and the startling size of some predators, waterbirds, and waders, many of which bird lovers rarely have the chance to see at close range.

Life Size Birds shows birds at actual size. Since it is not possible to fit a very large bird such as a bald eagle across two pages; the book shows the bird's head at actual size, and also includes an image of the whole bird.

There is a comprehensive overview of each bird, as well as a fact file with size-related statistics, longevity, and descriptions of vocalization, habitant, and distribution. The fact file also contains a map indicating migratory habits. In addition to the species entries, special feature pages can be found throughout Life Size Birds. These offer an in-depth look at topics such as birding, migration, and endangered species, as well as photo galleries of eggs, nests, and bills.

With Life Size Birds readers get an up-close, personal look at the world's masters of flight. John James Audubon would be proud to know that a life-size bird book is alive in the 21st century.

Professional & Technical / Medicine & Health Sciences / Clinical / Internal / Orthopedics / Series / Reference

AANA Advanced Arthroscopic Surgical Techniques Series, 5 volumes (Slack Incorporated)

Books in the Series include:

  • The Elbow and Wrist: AANA Advanced Arthroscopic Surgical Techniques edited by Felix H. Savoie III MD, Larry D. Field MD, & Scott P. Steinmann MD
  • The Foot and Ankle: AANA Advanced Arthroscopic Surgical Techniques edited by James W. Stone MD, John G. Kennedy MD, FRCS(Orth), & Mark Glazebrook MD
  • The Hip: AANA Advanced Arthroscopic Surgical Techniques edited by J.W. Thomas Byrd MD, Asheesh Bedi MD, & Allston J. Stubbs MD
  • The Knee: AANA Advanced Arthroscopic Surgical Techniques edited by Nicholas A. Sgaglione MD, James H. Lubowitz MD, & Matthew Provencher MD
  • The Shoulder: AANA Advanced Arthroscopic Surgical Techniques edited by Richard K.N. Ryu MD, Richard L. Angelo MD, & Jeffrey Abrams MD

In each of these volumes, the written text is supported by numerous color images and a website with invaluable narrated video clips depicting disease-specific arthroscopic techniques specific to the appropriate procedure.
Expert contributors have been chosen for their expertise in specific topics, so readers benefit by the highest quality and treatment recommendations to provide state-of-the-art care to their patients.

The Hip, The Knee and The Shoulder are described below.

Professional & Technical / Medicine & Health Sciences / Clinical / Internal / Orthopedics

The Hip: AANA Advanced Arthroscopic Surgical Techniques edited by J.W. Thomas Byrd MD, Asheesh Bedi MD, & Allston J. Stubbs MD (Slack Incorporated)

Co-published with the Arthroscopy Association of North America, The Hip: AANA Advanced Arthroscopic Surgical Techniques is a comprehensive technique-based book that presents the latest diagnostic and reconstructive techniques in arthroscopic surgery for the hip.
The Hip is authored by premier arthroscopic surgeons Drs. J.W. Thomas Byrd, Asheesh Bedi, and Allston J. Stubbs and their international list of expert contributors. Byrd, the founder of Nashville Sports Medicine & Orthopaedic Center, as well as the Nashville Sports Medicine Foundation, is a Clinical Professor in Vanderbilt University’s Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Rehabilitation. Bedi is the Harold and Helen W. Gehring Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and Chief of Sports Medicine and Shoulder Surgery at the University of Michigan and MedSport Program, an Adjunct Assistant Professor at the Hospital for Special Surgery/Weill Cornell Medical College, and a team physician for the University of Michigan, Eastern Michigan University, and the Detroit Lions. Stubbs is an Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the Wake Forest School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, North Carolina and Medical Director of Hip Arthroscopy for Wake Forest Baptist Health. 

Features of The Hip include:

  • Narrated video accompanying all surgical techniques, focusing on the stepwise approach to each operation.
  • Consistent organization throughout the book results in a bulleted and user-friendly interface for a quick reference or prolonged study.
  • Top 5 Technical Pearls for each procedure to enhance outcomes and to avoid common pitfalls and complications.
  • High-quality artwork and figures to complement clinical images.
  • Equipment and surgical technique checklists for quick reference prior to surgery.

Chapters in The Hip include:

Section I           Introduction

  1. A Layered Approach to Patient Evaluation with Prearthritic Hip Pain: History and Physical Examination
  2. Imaging in Hip Preservation Surgery: Plain X-Rays, Computed Tomography, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging
  3. Indications for Hip Arthroscopy
  4. Arthroscopic and Open Anatomy of the Hip

Section II         Operative Setup

  1. The Supine Approach to Hip Arthroscopy
  2. The Lateral Approach to Hip Arthroscopy
  3. The Use of lntraoperative Fluoroscopy and Dynamic Examination in Hip Arthroscopy: Achieving a Complete Femoroacetabular Impingement Correction
  4. Portal Placement in Hip Arthroscopy: Anatomic Considerations and Access to the Central, Peripheral, and Peritrochanteric Spaces
  5. Alternative Approaches to Access to the flip Joint: Starting in the Peripheral Compartment

Section III        Central and Peripheral Compartments

  1. Approaches to Capsulotomy and Capsular Management in Hip Arthroscopy
  2. Arthroscopic Labral Debridement. Repair, and Stitch Configurations
  3. Arthroscopic Management of Focal Chondral Injuries in the Hip
  4. Management of the Deficient Labium: Arthroscopic Labral Reconstruction - Indications and Technique
  5. Arthroscopic Treatment of Rim Impingement: Focal Retroversion, Global Retroversion, and Extra-Articular Impingement
  6. Arthroscopic Treatment of Cam-Type Deformity

Section IV        Extracapsular Management

  1. Treatment of the Iliopsoas Tendon: Indications and Arthroscopic Approaches for Lengthening and Release
  2. Greater Trochanteric Pain Syndrome and Endoscopy of the Peritrochanteric Space
  3. Arthroscopic Management of Abductor Tears
  4. Arthroscopic Management of Traumatic Hip Instability: Indications and Approach
  5. Endoscopy of the Deep Gluteal Space
  6. Endoscopy of Proximal Hamstring Injuries
  7. Common Complications of Hip Arthroscopy and Their Management

Section V         Controversies and Future Considerations

  1. Is There a Role for Arthroscopy in Hip Instability and Dysplasia? Indications and Technique
  2. The Role of Arthroscopy in Pediatric Hip Disorders: Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis and Legg-Calve-Perthes Disease
  3. The Role of Computer Modeling and Navigation in Arthroscopic Hip Surgery
  4. Special Considerations for Revision Hip Arthroscopy

Seventeen international specialists contribute 11 chapters to one text in a five-book series providing clinicians with state-of-the-art arthroscopic techniques for the shoulder, elbow and wrist, hip, knee, and foot and ankle. Coverage includes the clinical examination and imaging of the hip, followed by procedure-oriented chapters on chondral lesions, labral pathology, cam- type femoroacetabular impingement, pincer impingement, synovitis, degenerative joint disease, hip instability, internal snapping hip syndrome, external snapping hip syndrome, abductor tears, and computer-assisted surgery for femoroacetabular impingement. The material is illustrated throughout with full-color photographs and interpretive drawings. The accompanying CD-ROM contains six videos of techniques; users can also access the fully searchable text and supplemental materials online. – Book News, Inc.

The Hip is a comprehensive resource including preferred physical examination testing and diagnostic imaging choices in pre-operative planning and patient selection, state-of-the-art, step-by-step description of the procedures, detailed surgical equipment lists to perform each procedure, clear and precise indications for surgery and the thoughtful rationale behind stated contraindications, controversial indications, post-operative protocols, and potential complications.

Professional & Technical / Medicine & Health Sciences / Clinical / Internal / Orthopedics

The Knee: AANA Advanced Arthroscopic Surgical Techniques edited by Nicholas A. Sgaglione MD, James H. Lubowitz MD, & Matthew Provencher MD (Slack Incorporated)

Co-published with the Arthroscopy Association of North America, The Knee: AANA Advanced Arthroscopic Surgical Techniques is a comprehensive technique-based book that presents the latest diagnostic and reconstructive techniques in arthroscopic surgery for the knee.
The Knee is authored by premier arthroscopic surgeons Drs. Nicholas A. Sgaglione, James H. Lubowitz, Matthew T. Provencher, and their international list of expert contributors. Sgaglione is Professor and Chairman of the North Shore-Long Island Jewish Medical Center Department of Orthopedic Surgery and at the Hofstra North Shore-Long Island Jewish School of Medicine, Senior Vice President for Orthopaedics for the North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System and Executive Director of the Orthopaedic Institute. Lubowitz is Clinical Associate Professor, University of New Mexico, Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, founding Director of Taos Orthopaedic Institute and Taos Orthopaedic Institute Orthopaedic Sportsmedicine Fellowship. Provencher is the Chief of Sports Medicine and Surgery at Massachusetts General Hospital, Visiting Professor of Surgery and Orthopaedics at Harvard Medical School, and Professor of Surgery and Orthopaedics at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. As Chief of Sports Surgery at Massachusetts General Hospital, he is the Head Team Physician and Medical Director for the New England Patriots.

Features of The Knee include:

  • Narrated video accompanying all surgical techniques, focusing on the stepwise approach to each operation.
  • Consistent organization throughout the book results in a bulleted and user-friendly interface for a quick reference or prolonged study.
  • Top 5 Technical Pearls for each procedure to enhance outcomes and to avoid common pitfalls and complications.
  • High-quality artwork and figures to complement clinical images.
  • Equipment and surgical technique checklists for quick reference prior to surgery,

Chapters in The Knee include:

Section 1          General

  1. Knee Arthroscopy: Setup, Diagnosis, Portals, and Approaches
  2. Arthroscopic Synovectomy
  3. Arthroscopic Treatment of Popliteal Cysts
  4. Arthroscopic Management of Tibial Plateau Fractures
  5. Arthroscopic Treatment of Arthrofibrosis

Section II         Meniscus

  1. Arthroscopic Meniscal Resection
  2. Arthroscopic Meniscal Repair
  3. Arthroscopic Repair of Meniscal Root Avulsions
  4. Arthroscopically Assisted Meniscal Transplantation

Section III        Patella

  1. Arthroscopic Treatment of Patellar Tendinopathy (jumpers Knee)
  2. Arthroscopic Treatment of Patellar Instability
  3. Reconstruction of the Medial Pateliofemoral Ligament for Instability
  4. Tibial Tubercle Transfer

Section IV        Articular Cartilage

  1. Arthroscopic Approach to Knee Osteoarthritis
  2. Arthroscopic Approaches to Osteochondritis Dissecans
  3. Arthroscopic Marrow Stimulation Including Microfracture, Nanofracture, and Marrow Augmentation Scaffold Stimulation Techniques
  4. Autogenous Osteochondral Transplantation
  5. Osteochondral Ailograft Transplantation
  6. Approach to Chondral Damage in the Patellofemoral joint
  7. Articular Cartilage Transplantation
  8. Novel Techniques in Articular Cartilage Restoration
  9. Proximal Tibial and Distal Femoral Osteotomy

Section V         Ligaments

  1. Arthroscopic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair
  2. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Graft Choices and Harvest Techniques
  3. Single-Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction
  4. Anatomic Double-Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction
  5. Arthroscopic All-Inside Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction
  6. Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction
  7. Arthroscopic Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction
  8. Arthroscopic All-Inside Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction
  9. Tibial Inlay Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction
  10. Anatomic Reconstruction of the Posterolateral Corner of the Knee
  11. Anatomic Reconstruction of the Posteromedial Corner and Medial Collateral Ligament
  12. Treatment of Multiligament Knee Injuries

The Knee is a comprehensive resource including preferred physical examination testing and diagnostic imaging choices in pre-operative planning and patient selection, state-of-the-art, step-by-step description of the procedures, detailed surgical equipment lists to perform each procedure, clear and precise indications for surgery and the thoughtful rationale behind stated contraindications, controversial indications, post-operative protocols, and potential complications.
Professional & Technical / Medicine & Health Sciences / Clinical / Internal / Orthopedics

The Shoulder: AANA Advanced Arthroscopic Surgical Techniques edited by Richard K.N. Ryu MD, Richard L. Angelo MD, & Jeffrey Abrams MD (Slack Incorporated)

Co-published with the Arthroscopy Association of North America, The Shoulder: AANA Advanced Arthroscopic Surgical Techniques is a comprehensive technique-based book that presents the latest diagnostic and reconstructive techniques in arthroscopic surgery for the shoulder.
The Shoulder is authored by premier arthroscopic surgeons Drs. Richard K.N. Ryu, Richard L. Angelo, and Jeffrey S. Abrams, and their international list of expert contributors. Ryu, who has been in private practice in Santa Barbara since 1986, is the Series Editor for both the first and second 5-volume editions of the AANA Advanced Arthroscopic Surgery textbooks. He is the Wayne O. Southwick Visiting Professor at Yale and the Verne Inman Lecturer at UCSF. Angelo, who formerly served as a team physician for the University of Washington Huskies, is Clinical Professor for the Department of Orthopedics at the University of Washington and Chief of Surgery at Evergreen Medical Center in Kirkland, Washington. Abrams, who combines an academic with a community practice in Princeton, is a Clinical Professor at Seton Hall University, School of Graduate Medicine in South Orange, New Jersey and an attending surgeon at the University Medical Center of Princeton.

Features of The Shoulder include:

  • Narrated video accompanying all surgical techniques, focusing on the stepwise approach to each operation.
  • Consistent organization throughout the book results in a bulleted and user-friendly interface for a quick reference or prolonged study.
  • Top 5 Technical Pearls for each procedure to enhance outcomes and to avoid common pitfalls and complications.
  • High-quality artwork and figures to complement clinical images.
  • Equipment and surgical technique checklists for quick reference prior to surgery.

Chapters in The Shoulder include:

  1. Arthroscopic Knot Tying
  2. Arthroscopic Anterior Bankart Repair
  3. Arthroscopic Humeral Avulsion of the Glenohumeral Ligament Repair
  4. Revision Arthroscopic Shoulder Stabilization
  5. Arthroscopic Single-Row Rotator Cuff Repair
  6. Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Mobilization Techniques
  7. Arthroscopic Acromioclavicular Joint Repair for Acute Injury
  8. Arthroscopic Acromioclavicular joint Reconstruction With Allograft/Autograft
  9. Arthroscopic Extracellular Matrix Rotator Cuff Replacement/Augmentation
  10. Arthroscopic Hill-Sachs Remplissage
  11. Arthroscopic Capsular Plication
  12. Arthroscopic Linked Double-Row Rotator Cuff Repair
  13. Arthroscopic Bony Bankart Repair
  14. Arthroscopic Suprapectoral Biceps Tenodesis
  15. Arthroscopic Pancapsular Release
  16. Arthroscopic Anterior Glenoid Bone Block Stabilization
  17. Arthroscopic Latarjet Stabilization
  18. Arthroscopic Suprascapular Nerve Release: The Transverse Scapular Ligament and Spinoglenoid Notch
  19. Arthroscopic Subscapularis Repair: The Extra-Articular Technique
  20. Arthroscopic Transtendon Repair of Partial-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tear
  21. Arthroscopic Posterior Bankart Repair
  22. Arthroscopic Greater Tuberosity Fracture Repair
  23. Arthroscopic Bursectomy and Superomedial Angle Resection for the Treatment of Scapulothoracic Bursitis and Snapping Scapula Syndrome
  24. Arthroscopic Panlabral Repair
  25. Arthroscopic Superior Labral Anteroposterior Repair

The Shoulder is a comprehensive resource including preferred physical examination testing and diagnostic imaging choices in pre-operative planning and patient selection, state-of-the-art, step-by-step description of the procedures, detailed surgical equipment lists to perform each procedure, clear and precise indications for surgery and the thoughtful rationale behind stated contraindications, controversial indications, post-operative protocols, and potential complications.
Religion & Spirituality / Christianity / Biblical Studies / New Testament

'Behold, the Angels Came and Served Him': A Compositional Analysis of Angels in Matthew by Kristian A. Bendoraitis (The Library of New Testament Studies Series: Bloomsbury T&T Clark)

Angels have been analyzed in Christological research due to their primary function as messengers and mediators between heaven and earth. Their role in the Gospel narratives, however, has been largely unexplored.

Utilizing the Old Testament and sources from the Second Temple period to illustrate the variety of angel traditions, Kristian A. Bendoraitis in 'Behold, the Angels Came and Served Him' identifies how these traditions are reflected in Matthew's Gospel and interprets the passages in which angels appear or are represented, resulting in a detailed exegesis of those passages which specifically mention angels. Each reference is critically analyzed in view of its role in the Gospel's narrative and in light of Matthew's redactional hand. In addition, each chapter is accompanied by a discussion of relevant traditions of angels in order to illustrate how Matthew's use of angels has facilitated his Gospel's message. The examination concludes by postulating three factors in the inclusion of angel traditions in Matthew's narrative, pertaining both to Matthew's Christology and worldview.

Bendoraitis is an online Adjunct Lecturer at Spring Arbor University.

'Behold, the Angels Came and Served Him' is part of the The Library of New Testament Studies (LNTS), a premier book series that offers cutting-edge work for a readership of scholars, teachers in the field of New Testament studies, postgraduate students and advanced undergraduates.

'Behold, the Angels Came and Served Him' focuses on the ways that angel traditions shape Matthew's portrayal of Jesus and discipleship for the early church. Bendoraitis investigates the specific passages that refer to angels, paying close atten­tion to their part in the narrative of Matthew through a careful analysis of the literary context. This provides evidence that Matthew has intentionally used angel traditions (1) to advance his portrait of Jesus as an authoritative eschatological judge and (2) to express God at work in the life of Jesus while (3) relying upon and contributing to Matthew's worldview.

Bendoraitis says that owing to their active participation in both the heavenly and earthly realms, angels have been particularly valuable figures for Christology. Their presence in Jewish and early Christian literature has caused many to speculate on the relationship between Jesus and angels. Initially, Jesus was perceived to be an angel, but later research gravitated towards Jesus' possession of angelic characteristics and descriptions with angelic imagery. Angels also have their place in the narratives of the Gospels. In particular, the Gospel of Mathew seems to be interested in angels and often places angels and Jesus together in the same context. This suggests intentionality behind Matthew's portrayal of angels and a relationship worth investigating. In light of this, the book first paints a backdrop from which to begin an examination of angels in Matthew. Bendoraitis discusses the significance of angels and their place in Christological research. This is followed by an explanation for the choice of Matthew in the context of this investigation, a description of the approach 'Behold, the Angels Came and Served Him' takes, and a brief overview of the exegetical section.

The nature of the thesis' investigation requires a large amount of space dedicated to the individual texts that specifically mention angels in Matthew. Consequently, the nine chapters in 'Behold, the Angels Came and Served Him' are exegetical examinations of the references to angels in Matthew. In these chapters, some references lend themselves to being examined together (e.g. the three appearances of the angel of the Lord in the infancy narrative, Mt. 1.21; 2.13, 19) while others are approached individually (e.g. Mt. 22.30). The order of the chapters follows the narrative of the Gospel, beginning with the infancy narratives (Mt. 1.18-2.23) and concluding with the angel at the tomb in Mt. 28.2-8. Having completed an analysis of all the references to angels in the Gospel of Matthew, the final chapter revisits the conclusions of the previous chapters, discussing them according to common themes.

'Behold, the Angels Came and Served Him' provides a detailed exergesis of passages mentioning angels and critically analyzes references. The book fills a gap both in Matthean studies and in research on Christology and angels by tracing the contours of Matthew's portrayal of angels in his narrative and identifying the results of its contribution to Matthew's Christology.

Religion & Spirituality / Christianity / Theology / Ethics

Can War be Just in the 21st Century? edited by Tobias Winright & Laurie Johnston (Orbis Books)

… So I am honored to write this Foreword. This is an important book. In truth it is the kind of work in which those committed to nonviolence should be engaged. So it is with real enthusiasm I commend this book. May it be the beginning of the kind of work that just warriors and pacifists can share and in the process may we discover that we are friends. – from the foreword by Stanley Hauerwas

Can War be Just in the 21st Century?, edited by Tobias Winright and Laurie Johnston, is comprised of essays by leading scholars from around the world on the viability of the Just War tradition in a modern environment, with many essays offering specific historical examples of how the theory plays out in reality. Can there still be a ‘just war’? Under what circumstances? What are the new issues and concerns raised by advances into technology?

Winright holds the Hubert Mader Chair in the Albert Gnaegi Center for Health Care Ethics, is Associate Professor in the Department of Theological Studies at Saint Louis University, and is co-editor of the Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics. Johnston is Associate Professor of the Theology and Director of Fellowships at Emmanuel College in Boston, and serves on the Steering Committee of the Catholic Peacebuilding Network.

Cardinal Ratzinger's question about the applicability of the Just War Theory (JWT) in these early years of the twenty-first century is not merely a rhetorical one.

This present volume, Can War be Just in the 21st Century?, takes these concerns seriously by engaging the tradition and addressing new technologies and weapons, current problems and issues, neglected voices and perspectives. Its twelve contributors, including editors Winright and Johnston, are theological ethicists. Their task as ethicists is to ask the ‘ought’ questions. Is the way things are the way things ought to be? What ought we do? What kind of people ought we to be? These are prescriptive, normative questions regarding human and/or Christian character and choices, as individuals and as a community. Because war is a human activity – as foggy, violent, and horrible as it is – it is to be evaluated as such, that is, by whether it is moral or immoral.

War is not amoral. It is not like a tornado or a volcanic eruption; nor is war something that simply ‘breaks out;’ like a fire. For Christians, war either is always immoral (pacifism) or is sometimes immoral (JWT). With the latter, war also is sometimes morally justifiable, and when it is, it ought to be fought justly. Furthermore, as Saint Pope John Paul II emphasized in January 2003, shortly before the United States invaded Iraq, "War is not always inevitable." Indeed, it can be prevented before it starts; it can be stopped after embarking upon it. A ‘no’ can be said before going to war and to particular conduct during war – and this ‘no’ can come from the lips not only of pacifists but also of Christians and others who subscribe to the JWT.

Admittedly, rarely have such negative judgments been issued by just war ethicists, let alone by most other Christians, citizens, politicians, and gener­als who adhere neither to just war theory nor to pacifism.

Although Bush, Obama, and other political leaders might utter the words of just war, a number of theologians, ethicists, and others suspect that it is only a manipulative smokescreen used to ‘justify’ wars of ‘national interest,’ where moral considerations really do not have a claim and, simply put, might makes right. A school of thought known as ‘realism;’ often associated with Machiavelli, holds that the criteria of the JWT are inapplicable during war except when they serve the nation's interest. This is just war theory ‘without teeth;’ in which the rules are not firmly rooted and instead are easily bent or broken. While some just war ethicists might claim that just war is more ‘realistic’ than pacifism or nonviolence, just war theory and realism should not necessarily be equated or conflated. The contributors to Can War be Just in the 21st Century? do not use realism, as Stanley Hauerwas alleges about many just war thinkers, "to dismiss pacifism and to underwrite some version of just war."

The contributors acknowledge that nonviolence, more often than assumed, can be as realistic, or effective, as just war in resisting injustice. Still, they recognize that, in the eyes of real realists, not only nonviolence but also just war (‘with teeth’) can seem unrealistic. As Christian theologians, the contributors to Can War be Just in the 21st Century? try not to underestimate how nations, governments, and militaries really operate, but they also believe that they can do the right thing, too. They are not realists whose cynicism runs all the way down to the core; they strive to write with both eyes wide open. Moreover, the reality of war, even if not all of them have experienced it firsthand, deeply disturbs them and discomforts their deliberations. Even though they disagree with Sherman's dictum, they realize that war indeed is hell for all those who are scathed by it.

The aim of Can War be Just in the 21st Century? is to contribute to the informing of Catholics' consciences concerning just war, to equip them to discern just from unjust war, and to enable them to adhere to their convictions firmly. While they might not agree exactly on every detail of the JWT, they all identify with it and think it remains relevant.

The first essay in Can War be Just in the 21st Century?, by Lisa Sowle Cahill, who is one of their more senior contributors, explores further the JWT vis-à-vis the gospel, while surveying the developments from Saint Augustine to Saint Thomas Aquinas in the thirteenth century to today.

The editorial in La Civiltà Cattolica, although calling for the abandoning of just war, actually employed just war criteria to critique modern warfare, and then went on to say that the only justifiable war would be "a war of pure defense against an aggression actually taking place." Kenneth Himes's contribution to Can War be Just in the 21st Century? examines this trajectory in connection with humanitarian intervention today, including in connection with Pope Francis and the atrocities happening in Iraq and Syria committed by ISIS. So, even though the rules of the JWT have been bent and broken far too often over the centuries and in recent times, abusus non tollit usum ("the abuse does not negate their proper use").

Six men and six women authored these twelve chapters, and not all of them are from the United States. In addition to the aforementioned chapters by Lisa Sowle Cahill and Kenneth R. Himes, there are chapters on a number of urgent matters, as well as chapters that offer oft-neglected perspectives in Catholic just war ethics. As for the former, there are essays on drones and robots (Brian Stiltner), cluster munitions (Tobias Winright), self-determination and the use of force by the parties involved with efforts to secede from an existing state (Gerard F. Powers), torture and terror (Anna Floerke Scheid), environmental destruction (Laurie Johnston), and the testing of nuclear weapons (Rachel Hart Winters). Neglected perspectives are provided in the essays on women in combat and civilian immunity (Cristina Richie), intrastate conflicts in Africa (Elias O. Opongo), civilian immunity in the conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (John Kiess), and, finally, returning warriors' experience of ‘moral injury’ (Tobias Winright and E. Ann Jeschke).

We tend to assume that pacifism is radical and the Just War Tradition is mainstream, but the authors of this volume make clear that the Just War Tradition would have radical consequences if it were taken seriously. These essays bring the tradition up to date, not by stretching it to make it justify new tactics and technologies, but by subjecting the horrors of modern war to strict moral scrutiny, and thereby enhancing our ability to say 'No' to violence when conscience demands it. Thinking about war with integrity requires the kind of moral seriousness exhibited in this volume. – William T. Cavanaugh, DePaul University
Tobias Winright and Laurie Johnston have produced an outstanding collection of essays on the relevance of the just war tradition to contemporary warfare. This book is a must-read – not only for Christian ethicists, but for any citizens concerned about the morality of war as it is fought today and will be fought in the future. – Stephen J. Pope, Boston College
Can War be Just in the 21st Century? is a lively overview of the ways in which a younger generation of Catholic ethicists is extending the just war tradition to cover such topics as drones, cluster bombs, humanitarian intervention, and care for the harm suffered by soldiers. Their work is both careful and pioneering. – John Langan, S.J., Georgetown University
Provides a timely and rigorous articulation of the just war tradition.... I highly recommend it to anyone who wants to seriously think about Christianity, war, peace, and justice in the 21st century. – Mark Allman, Merrimack College

Can War be Just in the 21st Century? provides a helpful resource for Catholics and others who believe that, sadly, under certain conditions when just peacemaking practices have failed (or there is not time to attempt them), the use of force, including lethal force, is justified – namely, when there is no other way to defend innocent lives from unjust aggressors. And of course, not every possible topic is addressed in this volume, but the essays in Can War be Just in the 21st Century? will stimulate more imaginative attempts dealing with Ratzinger's question about whether war can be just in the twenty-first century.

Social Sciences / Archaeology / Culture / Folklore

The Materiality of Magic: An artifactual investigation into ritual practices and popular beliefs edited by Ceri Houlbrook & Natalie Armitage (Oxbow Books)

The subject of ‘magic' has long been considered peripheral and sensationalist, the word itself having become something of an academic taboo. However, beliefs in magic and the rituals that surround them are extensive – as are their material manifestations – and to avoid them is to ignore a prevalent aspect of cultures worldwide, from prehistory to the present day. The Materiality of Magic addresses the value of the material record as a resource in investigations into magic, ritual practices, and popular beliefs. The chronological and geographic focus of the nine papers varies from prehistory to the present-day, including numinous interpretations of fossils and ritual deposits in Bronze Age Europe; apotropaic devices in Roman and Medieval Britain; the evolution of superstitions and ritual customs – from the ‘voodoo doll' of Europe and Africa to a Scottish ‘wishing-tree'; and an exploration of spatiality in West African healing practices.

The Materiality of Magic is the product of the 34th annual conference of the Theoretical Archaeology Group (TAG), held in Liverpool, 2012. The editors, Natalie Armitage and Ceri Houlbrook, organized a session for this conference based on their shared academic interests. Despite hailing from different disciplines – Armitage from English and American Studies; Houlbrook from Archaeology – and despite their chronological and geographic focuses varying greatly, they share an interest in how notions of magic are manifested materially: Armitage primarily in the voodoo doll; Houlbrook, the British coin-tree.

According to Houlbrook and Armitage, there are simply some words in academia which have lost their credibility — or never possessed it to begin with. Supernatural is one such word; magic, defiantly included in the title of The Materiality of Magic, is another. These words have become taboo; academic anathemas. And even when scholars are careful to avoid using the words magic, supernatural, superstition, folklore, etc., such studies concerned with these topics are still considered fringe; they linger on the edges of `respectable' disciplines, not quite falling into academic oblivion but never managing to establish themselves as key, estimable subjects.

The word materiality has multiple meanings and purposes. Firstly, it refers to the materiality – the significance, importance, relevance – of the study of magic, which, as demonstrated throughout this volume, proves to be an inherent aspect of societies worldwide; hence a more apt title for The Materiality of Magic would have been The Materiality of the Materiality of Magic. Secondly, it refers to the physical substance and tangibility of the artifacts and monuments, which are presented as case-studies by the contributors; artifacts and monuments which are the material manifestations of beliefs, rituals, and customs concerned with magic.

Thirdly, it is intended as an ironic juxtaposition to the word magic. The OED defines material as `Concerned with worldly things; unspiritual', which stands in stark contrast to the unworldly and indubitably spiritual subject-matter of magic, implying that the materiality of magic is something of an oxymoron. However, they believe this to be far from the case, advocating instead the pertinence of utilizing the artifactual evidence in investigations into magic, and the supposed disparity between the words materiality and magic is questioned and refuted throughout this volume. Fourthly, and finally, materiality is employed to indicate methodology, locating this volume within the dialogue of material culture studies.

The Materiality of Magic is a collection of papers from the 1996 TAG session, exploring the relationship between the disciplines of Archaeology and Folklore, and how they can complement each other. The theoretical approaches are diverse, as is the geographic spectrum to an extent, with case-studies drawn from Western Europe, the Mediterranean and North America. However, as the title suggests, it is primarily concerned with the folklore – legends and traditional tales – associated with historic sites, as opposed to the material manifestations of magic.

In putting a call out for papers, Houlbrook and Armitage had hoped to encourage researchers from a variety of disciplines to contribute; researchers who may have felt that magic should be brought back from the fringes of disciplines and given a more established academic platform. The range of proposals they received surprised them. Material culture is a field of study which transcends disciplines, but Houlbrook and Armitage say they had not expected magic to similarly prove so inter-disciplinary. With contributors hailing from Archaeology, Anthropology, History, and English and American Studies, and their focuses ranging in chronology and geography from the Neolithic Near-East, Bronze Age Denmark and Ireland, Roman-Britain and medieval England, to contemporary Africa and modern-day Scotland, the papers presented at the conference demonstrate the prevalence of magic worldwide, regardless of time period. The number of proposals for papers also demonstrated that many researchers across disciplines – ranging from postgraduates to professors – are willing, even eager, to engage with the concept of magic.

Opening The Materiality of Magic is Peter Leeming's paper "Also found... (not illustrated)...": The curious case of the missing magical fossils'. Leeming observes the neglect fossils often suffer from when discovered in Neolithic and Bronze Age contexts in Britain and Ireland, usually only noted in passing in archaeological reports and rarely illustrated. Drawing on the often incidental details offered in archaeological reports, along with the work of Kenneth Oakley of the British Museum, Leeming considers the possible symbolic and apotropaic usages of fossils, suggesting that these objects were perceived of historically as possessing magical agency.

The second chapter, Arranged artifacts and materials in Irish Bronze Age ritual deposits: A consideration of prehistoric practice and intention', is penned by Katherine Leonard. Leonard's geographic and chronological focus is the Irish Bronze Age, and she offers ritual interpretations of grouped artifacts carefully arranged during deposition. Drawing on examples such as the Early Bronze Age `hoard' from a river channel at Carhan, Co. Kerry, where 10–11 axes were arranged in a circle, cutting-edges facing outwards, around a deposit of wood ash and deer bone fragments, Leonard uses the material evidence to argue that a ritual intention is communicated through the precise arrangement of objects relative to each other.

Adrian Chadwick examines the materialities of magic in Iron Age and Romano-British settlement sites in the third chapter of The Materiality of Magic, `Doorways, ditches and dead dogs – excavating and recording material manifestations of practical magic amongst later prehistoric and Romano-British communities'. Focusing on two large-scale, open-area investigations of settlement sites with which Chadwick was involved – Wattle Sykes, West Yorkshire, and Barton Seagrave, Northamptonshire – he examines the material evidence for practical magic present at these, and various other, sites.

The fourth chapter, `Domestic magic and the walking dead in medieval England: A diachronic approach', is written by Stephen Gordon, who explores the material evidence testifying to the ways in which the medieval household was protected against malevolent supernatural forces, particularly the walking dead. Gordon aims to demonstrate that, while archaeological studies into the fear of the walking dead have largely focused on apotropaic strategies conducted at gravesites, mapping written medieval sources onto the often obscure or overlooked material evidence reveals that other techniques – e.g. the employment of threshold deposits – were observed in domestic contexts.

Natalie Armitage's paper, `European and African figural ritual magic: The beginnings of the voodoo doll myth' explores figurative ritual magic practices from Europe and how they may have influenced the reading of figures from Africa to establish the roots of the common misconception about the origins and nature of the voodoo doll as it is widely perceived today. Armitage focuses on how the material form of the Kongo nkisi nkondi would have been viewed and interpreted by the contemporary European observer, establishing a basis for the prevalent misinterpretations of African culture as it moved to the Americas and evolved into the religion and magical traditions of Haitian Vodou.

The sixth chapter of The Materiality of Magic, `Binding spells and curse tablets through time', written by Debora Moretti, explores the chronologically and geographically widespread phenomenon of curse tablets. Considering such elements as the sympathetic use of specific materials and the liminal natures of their places of deposition, Moretti aims to demonstrate that the curse tablet is the ideal material object for illustrating how magical practices are evinced in the archaeological record.

Ceri Houlbrook's paper, `The wishing-tree of Isle Maree: The evolution of a Scottish folkloric practice', takes as its starting point a `wishing-tree' created in April 2012 on the shores of Loch Maree, Scotland, as part of a local festival. Employing a diachronic approach, Houlbrook demonstrates that, while this wishing-tree is a contemporary structure, its history can be traced back to the 1700s: to the original wishing-tree on Isle Maree itself.

The eighth chapter, 'Ciki and jiki: The inner and outer layers of healers' workspaces in Madina, Accra', is written by Bryn Trevelyan James, who draws on two seasons of fieldwork with traditional healers in Ghana in order to explore anthropomorphic symbolism in the ordering of practitioners' workspaces.

The Materiality of Magic concludes with `The Little Mannie with his daddy's horns', a paper penned by John Prag, Professor Emeritus of Archaeological Studies and of Classics, of Manchester Museum. Prag's frank, amusing and highly insightful account of Manchester Museum's acquisition and subsequent treatment of `little mannie' – initially thought to be a Celtic head – speaks of the importance of archaeological context in determining the origin of an object.

The Materiality of Magic provides a platform from which to showcase innovative research and theoretical approaches in magical practices and beliefs, which has largely been neglected within archaeology and related disciplines, and goes a long way toward redressing this neglect.

Travel / Outdoors & Nature / Art

An Illustrated Coastal Year: The seashore uncovered season by season by Celia Lewis (Bloomsbury Publishing Plc)

The sea, once it casts its spell, holds one in its web of wonder forever. – Jacques Yves Cousteau

They say no one in the British Isles lives more than an hour or two from the coast, a coastline of contrasts with scenery that changes from estuaries, shingle beaches, salt marshes and sand dunes, to rocky shores, rugged cliffs, machair and bustling harbors. There is something delightful about walking along the strandline of a beach and looking to see what one can find. So many fascinating things wash up, sometimes from far afield, but look a little closer and travelers will discover that the 17,800 km of coast are home to flora and fauna that are found nowhere else. The shores are teeming with wildlife, be it in the water, on the tideline, clinging to cliffs or in the skies above them, and with An Illustrated Coastal Year readers can learn more about familiar and favorite coastal species and some intriguing lesser-known marine creatures.

Written and presented in the same style as 2013's popular An Illustrated Country Year, Celia Lewis's An Illustrated Coastal Year covers the wildlife found on and around the seashore, above and underwater. Lewis has won several prizes for her art. In addition to being the author and illustrator of An Illustrated Country Year, she has also has created the Illustrated Guide series of books on choosing and keeping chickens, pigs, cows, ducks, and geese.

Illustrated throughout with Lewis's gorgeous watercolors and linocuts, An Illustrated Coastal Year is broken up into seasons, each featuring illustrations of flowers, insects, animals, fish, birds, shells, and all sea-related species found during that time of year. Lewis's insight provides an enchanting new way to explore the coasts of the United Kingdom and northern Europe.

Within each season are sections on what travelers might see or pick up during a walk along the tideline or along a coastal path, as well as tips for what to look out for and how to forage with using what they might find. Also included are inspiring craft projects suitable for all ages and tasty recipes by some of the best seafood chefs. Other sections include What's Flowering (wild flowers and grasses), How-Tos (e.g. how to read a tide table, how to recognize cloud formations), What's the Difference? (e.g. gulls, flat fish, etc.), and What's This? (identification guides for beachcombed items, such as mermaid's purse, etc).
Season by season, Lewis's illustrations in An Illustrated Coastal Year show the flowers, birds, animals, fish and insects found at that time of year. Her craft projects, using driftwood, pebbles and shells, are suitable for all ages and will encourage travelers to put beachcombed mementos to surprising uses. Or get creative with food and work some foraged ingredients into tasty recipes by Lewis and many of the best seafood chefs.

The book is a veritable symphony of the sea…. Artist Celia Lewis's tone is fresh and breezy, but beneath the low-key charm lies a trove of riches and reminders about the UK coast…. Dotted throughout the book are celebrations of glorious British wildlife ... lovingly depicted in exquisite detail making them a joy to pore over. – Lucy Jones, BBC Wildlife

This beautifully illustrated book will enhance any visit to the seaside. Celia Lewis combines her own beautiful watercolours with informative text, showing how seasons change at the water's edge. Birds, animals, fish and insects – they are all here. – This England

This is an artistic look at life along the seashore – Bird Watching

An amusing and informative anthology of coastal wildlife through the year, An Illustrated Coastal Year highlights all the flora and fauna to look for when visiting the coast of England and is perfect to dip into before or after any trip to the seashore. The book will enhance any visit to the coast of the British Isles at any time of year, kindling the amateur naturalist in anyone, at any age. 

 

Contents this Issue:

Sharon Pollock: First Woman of Canadian Theatre edited by Donna Coates (The West Series, Book 7: University of Calgary Press)

Magazines, Travel, and Middlebrow Culture: Canadian Periodicals in English and French, 1925-1960 by Faye Hammill & Michelle Smith (The University of Alberta Press)

The Soft Touch: A Photographer's Guide to Manipulating Focus by Jim Cornfield (Amherst Media)

Meditation in Seven Steps: Unlocking the Depths of Human Fulfillment Audio CD – Audiobook, 2 CDs, running time: 2 hours, 29 minutes by Reginald A. Ray PhD (Sounds True)

Why Should Anyone Be Led by You?: What It Takes To Be An Authentic Leader by Robert Goffee & Gareth Jones (Harvard Business Review Press) (February 2006)

Streamlined: Classic Cars of the 20th Century by Malte Jürgens, with photography by Michel Zumbrunn (Schiffer Publishing, Ltd)

Benjamin West and the Struggle to be Modernby Loyd Grossman (Merrell Publishers)

The Lion of Sabray: The Afghani Warrior Who Defied the Taliban and Saved the Life of Navy SEAL Marcus Luttrell by Patrick Robinson (Touchstone)

Let's Talk About Death: Asking the Questions that Profoundly Change the Way We Live and Die by Steve Gordon & Irene Kacandes (Prometheus Books)

The Vulture: An Ike Schwartz Mystery by Frederick Ramsay (Ike Schwartz Series: Poisoned Pen Press)

Life Size Birds by Nancy J. Hajeski (Thunder Bay Press)

AANA Advanced Arthroscopic Surgical Techniques Series, 5 volumes (Slack Incorporated)

Books in the Series include:

  • The Elbow and Wrist: AANA Advanced Arthroscopic Surgical Techniques edited by Felix H. Savoie III MD, Larry D. Field MD, & Scott P. Steinmann MD
  • The Foot and Ankle: AANA Advanced Arthroscopic Surgical Techniques edited by James W. Stone MD, John G. Kennedy MD, FRCS(Orth), & Mark Glazebrook MD
  • The Hip: AANA Advanced Arthroscopic Surgical Techniques edited by J.W. Thomas Byrd MD, Asheesh Bedi MD, & Allston J. Stubbs MD
  • The Knee: AANA Advanced Arthroscopic Surgical Techniques edited by Nicholas A. Sgaglione MD, James H. Lubowitz MD, & Matthew Provencher MD
  • The Shoulder: AANA Advanced Arthroscopic Surgical Techniques edited by Richard K.N. Ryu MD, Richard L. Angelo MD, & Jeffrey Abrams MD

In each of these volumes, the written text is supported by numerous color images and a website with invaluable narrated video clips depicting disease-specific arthroscopic techniques specific to the appropriate procedure.
Expert contributors have been chosen for their expertise in specific topics, so readers benefit by the highest quality and treatment recommendations to provide state-of-the-art care to their patients.

'Behold, the Angels Came and Served Him': A Compositional Analysis of Angels in Matthew by Kristian A. Bendoraitis (The Library of New Testament Studies Series: Bloomsbury T&T Clark)

Can War be Just in the 21st Century? edited by Tobias Winright & Laurie Johnston (Orbis Books)

The Materiality of Magic: An artifactual investigation into ritual practices and popular beliefs edited by Ceri Houlbrook & Natalie Armitage (Oxbow Books)

An Illustrated Coastal Year: The seashore uncovered season by season by Celia Lewis (Bloomsbury Publishing Plc)